Donna Meredith Dixon

CLC, CPSAS,

APSATS  trained

Board member

Christian Sex Addiction Specialists International

(C-SASI)

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©2019  Donna Meredith Dixon 

 

Johari's WHAT?

March 19, 2017

 

 

 

 

American psychologists Joseph Luft and Harry Ingham developed Johari’s Window in 1955.  The tool is based on two ideas: trust can be acquired as we reveal information about ourselves to others, and we can discover more about ourselves when we receive or solicit others feedback. The goal in .

 

While there are guidelines I use when using this tool, as both a coach and peer facilitator trainer, I love introducing Johari’s window because it can help….

  • Build personal self-awareness

  • Increase personal development

  • Improve our communications

  • Increase our interpersonal relationships

  • Guide group dynamics, and;

  • Strengthen team/group development

The Johari Window model can help us understand how we perceive ourselves as well as how others see (and experience) us. It a helpful tool to gain mutual understanding between individuals within a group. As the diagram below shows, we can increase the open area through self disclosure as well as receiving/soliciting feedback from others. The open area is more likely to increase within safe relationships as trust builds, through vulnerability and transparency.

 

 

 

 

Area 1 Open Area known by self and others

 Area 1 represents things we know about ourselves as well as what others know about us, including behaviors, knowledge, skills, attitudes, and "public" history. To build intimacy and connection, our personal (or a group’s) goal is expanding the area through disclosure and seeking others feedback.

 

Area 2 Blind area unknown by self, known by others

Area 2 represents things about us we are not aware of, but others observe, hear or experience. Decreasing our blind area requires a commitment and willingness to not just accept, but solicit others’ feedback.

 

Area 3 Hidden area known by self, unknown by others 

Area 3 represents what we know about ourselves but chose not to reveal. Decreasing the hidden area requires disclosure.

Unknown area Unknown by self OR others

 

Area 4 Unknown

Area 4 contains feelings, latent abilities, attitudes, and experiences often just below the surface, unknown to us or others. Area 4 often decreases through self-disclosure or feedback from others.

 

So how can you use Johari's Window? Well, I started by asking myself reflective questions – and then invited others into a conversation. (That seeking feedback step is crucial! And trusting others ... whew. That CAN be problematic. So, remember, share openly… and seek feedback… only with those you trust. YOU get to make that decision.

 

If you enjoy this type of tool, I would love to hear your feedback afterward!

Open area: What do you share openly with a spouse or significant other?

What do you share openly with others at work or school?

What do you share openly with family members?

What do you share openly with close friends?

 

With each question, consider asking yourself questions like these: When do I feel comfortable sharing openly with him/her? What makes it difficult?  If it’s difficult, what is within my control to change? What do I need from him/her that might help me share more openly? How can I communicate my need in a way that builds connection?

 

As you have time, move on to the hidden area, asking yourself questions like:

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) disclosing hidden areas in my life with my spouse or significant other?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) disclosing hidden areas in my life with others at work or school?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) disclosing hidden areas in my life with family members?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) disclosing hidden areas in my life with close friends?

 

With each question, consider asking yourself questions like these: What feelings keep me from disclosing some of the hidden areas of my life with him/her? What is within my control to change? What do I need from him/her that might help me move toward disclosing? How can I communicate my desire to be more vulnerable, transparent?

 

Finally, soliciting feedback

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) seeking honest feedback from my spouse or significant other?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) seeking honest feedback from others at work or school?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) seeking honest feedback from family members?

What keeps me from (appropriately, depending on the relationship) disclosing hidden areas in my life with close friends?

 

With each question, consider asking yourself questions like these: What feelings keep me from asking feedback from him/her? What about those feelings may be within my control to change? What do I need from him/her that might help me move toward asking for feedback? How can I communicate my desire to grow and experience more authentic relationships?

 

 

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